Mac Edition Radio Interview with C. David Tobie & David Saffir

MacEdition

Harris Fogel  caught up with David Saffir and myself at PhotoPlus Expo, and spent an evening discussing color management, as it relates to photography, mobile, and video. Here’s a MacEditionRadio.com audio interview that captures some of that conversation. Thanks, Harris, for an interesting evening, and a very professional interview!

Credits: C. David Tobie, Copyright 2013. Website: CDTobie.com Return to Blog’s Main Page

Color Analysis of the iPad Mini and Retina iPad Mini

Note: I am republishing this article, as it pertains equally to the new Retina Display iPad Mini, which shares similar screen color with the non-Retina version.

Characteristics of the Fourth Generation iPad with Retina Display

There are not too many surprises with the fourth generation full size iPad (wouldn’t it be great if Apple gave these products functional names?). Its largely a refresh for the sake of updating the processor and moving the connector system to the new Lightning Connector. Both worthwhile improvements, but not anything to concern us here. Still, there are more questions to be considered with the new iPad mini.

Characteristics of the iPad mini

The screen of the iPad mini offers the pixel-count of the pre-Retina iPads, in a smaller form factor. Not retina resolution, but somewhere in between the non-Retina full size iPads, and the Retina versions, by way of its decreased screen size. Many will choose to live with this enhanced, but not “Retinaed” resolution (yes, I just turned Retina into a verb) in return for the convenience of the smaller form factor and the lower price of the new mini. But what about its color characteristics for serious uses? Has Apple taken a step backwards there as well, in order to make the new mini more cost competitive in its (already populated) size range?

Earlier Testing

The answer is yes, and no. As we know from previous testing, the Retina iPad screens (and the iPhone 5 Retina screen as well) have been updated from the earlier, twisted, sub-sRGB color space of early iOS devices, to a color space very close to sRGB. The gamut plot below shows the iPad 3, with sRGB overlaid, as that order provides the clearest indication of their match.  The green primary of the iPad 3 actually exceeds sRGB by a bit, but overall this is a great match.

sRGB gamut over iPad3 gamut

We have also studied the gamut of earlier iOS devices, and seen how this gamut effects their display of web images (in sRGB) and web videos in Rec-709, which shares a number of key characteristics with sRGB. The image below is the second generation iPad, overlaid on the third generation iPad, showing the smaller and twisted gamut of the earlier screens. There is no doubt that the color accuracy of the sRGB-sized recent devices is superior to the older devices.

iPad2 gamut over iPad3 gamut

Color of the iPad mini

With that background information in mind, lets look at the gamut of the iPad mini in relation to sRGB. First, its important to note that the white point (global color tone) of the iPad mini is close to the target value of 6500K, and the gamma (ramp from black to white) is very close to the target value of Gamma 2.2. In the image below, you will recognize the earlier, sub-sRGB gamut, and twisted primaries, with the added twist of primary green, and well as primary blue, being offset sufficiently from the sRGB primaries to lie outside of sRGB, making color correction that much more difficult.

iPad mini gamut in blue, compared to sRGB in red

Conclusion

Yes, this gamut looks quite familiar, as you can see by comparing it to the previous illustrations. The iPad mini does indeed revert to the smaller, twisted shape of the earlier iOS gamut. Apple seldom takes a step backward in their relentless move forward, but here we have one example of it. So, if you were considering getting an iPad mini for use as a photo or video portfolio, please note that these color deficiencies will effect your results.

It is quite likely that in the next generation of iPad mini, Apple will move the device forward to a full sRGB gamut (and who knows, perhaps Retina resolution as well). So at this time the larger gen 3 and gen 4 iPads are the optimal iPads for display of critical color. It is possible to color calibrate the iPad mini with Datacolor’s SpyderGallery application, to produce corrected color (within the limits of the reduced gamut) in the Gallery viewer, or in other Apps if you launder your images through SpyderGallery. But for color critical uses, it may be worth holding off for a generation, to see what Apple has up its sleeve next time for the iPad mini.

Credits: C. David Tobie, Copyright 2013.   Website: CDTobie.com   Return to Blog’s Main Page

C David Tobie Presents at Stanford University’s SCIEN Coloquia Lecture Series

StanfordSCIEN

David Cardinal recently wrote an article on my presentation at Stanford University for the Datacolor SpyderBLOG. For those of you interested in color management, it covers some of the issues I addressed in that lecture.

Click HERE to view the article.

Photo Credit: David Cardinal, Copyright 2013. Website: CDTobie.com Return to Blog’s Main Page

Comparison: How Using a Lensbaby Affects Photography

I recently had the opportunity to shoot with my long-distance friend David Saffir. We are usually thousands of miles apart, so this was a great chance to work side-by-side. One of the goals of the shoot was for David to experience Lensbaby’s lenses and macro attachments, and since the upcoming webinar Datacolor is co-sponsoring with Lensbaby is on floral photography, we went to the Santa Barbara Botanic Garden, as a prime location for shooting native California flowers, as well as landscapes.

When reviewing images after the shoot, I was struck by a pair of shots of the same view across Mission Canyon. David Saffir’s image was taken with the Fujifilm X-Pro1, with the 35mm f/1.4 lens. Mine was shot with the Canon 5D Mark lll, with a Lensbaby Composer lens. Comparing the two images is a good opportunity to analyze Lensbaby photography; highlighting some of its unique features.

Final Image by David Saffir

Final Image by David Saffir

Lets start with the “straight” photo, shot with the X-Pro1. David cropped this image to what he felt was the best composition. The slightly hazy air, and its effect on the shaded portion on the opposite canyon wall was part of what had drawn his attention to this scene, along with the powerful silhouetting of the foreground tree trunks, and their dramatically lit leaves. Here the eye moves around the composition, following the dark lines created by the tree trunks and limbs, and settles on the leaves, and finally on the little vignette of the trees on the far side later in the examination of the image. This is how traditional landscape photography controls the eye of the viewer to draw it to the areas of interest.

Final Lensbaby image, by CDTobie

Final Lensbaby image, by CDTobie

Now, lets compare this to the Lensbaby shot. Here the branch with the orange leaves has been placed in the center of the image, where the sharp focal zone occurs, making it a more important part of the composition. And the sun has been placed where it will shine through the trees, producing a dazzling effect. So, even standing side-by-side, the intended compositions are somewhat different. But in both images the small story of the delicate tracery of branches on the far wall of the canyon is important. However, with the Lensbaby image, further emphasis is placed on this scene, as well as on the branch of orange leaves in front of it, by the selective focus of the Lensbaby lens.

Center Detail, David Saffir's Image

Center Detail, David Saffir’s Image

Center Detail, CDTobie's Lensbaby Image

Center Detail, CDTobie’s Lensbaby Image

The outer regions of the “standard” image are as sharply focused as the central area, allowing the eye to move into and out of them at the same tempo as the center of the image, with only the content to control the eye movement. But in the Lensbaby shot, increasingly less focus, and more distortion, occurs in areas farther from the focal center. This creates an artistic blur effect that mimics the way the eye sees, making this image look “right” when the viewer is in the right range of distances from the image, and looking at the center of focus. To look elsewhere in the image is to view the blur that can’t usually be examined, as the focus of the eye moves as the viewer attempts to view these regions, bringing them into sharp focus as well. Here that does not happen, allowing the viewer to examine the peripheral regions, examining the blur and the stretching of the elements further out from the image center, which have a beauty all their own.

Off-Center Detail, David Saffir Image

Off-Center Detail, David Saffir Image

Off-Center Detail, CDTobie Lensbaby Image

Off-Center Detail, CDTobie Lensbaby Image

Both images are good compositions, and interesting images. The less literal and more poetic feel of the second image is caused almost entirely by the use of the Lensbaby lens. Not all viewers will be comfortable with this different way of seeing, but those with a more artistic view will immediately see the beauty of the Lensbaby version of the scene.

Credits: C. David Tobie, Copyright 2012.   Website: CDTobie.com   Return to Blog’s Main Page

C David Tobie to Present at International Printing Week, Cal Poly

PrintWeekCaLPoly

Anyone attending International Printing Week at the Cal Poly, or in the San Luis Obispo, CA area, please join C David Tobie, Datacolor Product Technology Manager, for a one-hour presentation on Display Calibration for All Your Viewing Devices. This session runs from 4PM to 5PM on Tuesday, Jan 28. This session will cover calibration for a wide array of display types, multiple display tuning, projector calibration, and iPhone/iPad calibration. This session is restricted to Cal Poly students and those with International Printing Week passes; please contact the Graphic Communication Department at the URL above if you are interested in attending.

Credits: C. David Tobie, Copyright 2012. Website: CDTobie.com Return to Blog’s Main Page

Color Analysis of the iPad mini

Note: I am republishing this article, as it pertains equally to the new Retina Display iPad Mini, which shares similar screen color with the non-Retina version.

Characteristics of the Fourth Generation iPad with Retina Display

There are not too many surprises with the fourth generation full size iPad (wouldn’t it be great if Apple gave these products functional names?). Its largely a refresh for the sake of updating the processor and moving the connector system to the new Lightning Connector. Both worthwhile improvements, but not anything to concern us here. Still, there are more questions to be considered with the new iPad mini.

Characteristics of the iPad mini

The screen of the iPad mini offers the pixel-count of the pre-Retina iPads, in a smaller form factor. Not retina resolution, but somewhere in between the non-Retina full size iPads, and the Retina versions, by way of its decreased screen size. Many will choose to live with this enhanced, but not “Retinaed” resolution (yes, I just turned Retina into a verb) in return for the convenience of the smaller form factor and the lower price of the new mini. But what about its color characteristics for serious uses? Has Apple taken a step backwards there as well, in order to make the new mini more cost competitive in its (already populated) size range?

Earlier Testing

The answer is yes, and no. As we know from previous testing, the Retina iPad screens (and the iPhone 5 Retina screen as well) have been updated from the earlier, twisted, sub-sRGB color space of early iOS devices, to a color space very close to sRGB. The gamut plot below shows the iPad 3, with sRGB overlaid, as that order provides the clearest indication of their match.  The green primary of the iPad 3 actually exceeds sRGB by a bit, but overall this is a great match.

sRGB gamut over iPad3 gamut

We have also studied the gamut of earlier iOS devices, and seen how this gamut effects their display of web images (in sRGB) and web videos in Rec-709, which shares a number of key characteristics with sRGB. The image below is the second generation iPad, overlaid on the third generation iPad, showing the smaller and twisted gamut of the earlier screens. There is no doubt that the color accuracy of the sRGB-sized recent devices is superior to the older devices.

iPad2 gamut over iPad3 gamut

Color of the iPad mini

With that background information in mind, lets look at the gamut of the iPad mini in relation to sRGB. First, its important to note that the white point (global color tone) of the iPad mini is close to the target value of 6500K, and the gamma (ramp from black to white) is very close to the target value of Gamma 2.2. In the image below, you will recognize the earlier, sub-sRGB gamut, and twisted primaries, with the added twist of primary green, and well as primary blue, being offset sufficiently from the sRGB primaries to lie outside of sRGB, making color correction that much more difficult.

iPad mini gamut in blue, compared to sRGB in red

Conclusion

Yes, this gamut looks quite familiar, as you can see by comparing it to the previous illustrations. The iPad mini does indeed revert to the smaller, twisted shape of the earlier iOS gamut. Apple seldom takes a step backward in their relentless move forward, but here we have one example of it. So, if you were considering getting an iPad mini for use as a photo or video portfolio, please note that these color deficiencies will effect your results.

It is quite likely that in the next generation of iPad mini, Apple will move the device forward to a full sRGB gamut (and who knows, perhaps Retina resolution as well). So at this time the larger gen 3 and gen 4 iPads are the optimal iPads for display of critical color. It is possible to color calibrate the iPad mini with Datacolor’s SpyderGallery application, to produce corrected color (within the limits of the reduced gamut) in the Gallery viewer, or in other Apps if you launder your images through SpyderGallery. But for color critical uses, it may be worth holding off for a generation, to see what Apple has up its sleeve next time for the iPad mini.

Credits: C. David Tobie, Copyright 2012.   Website: CDTobie.com   Return to Blog’s Main Page

Datacolor Experts to Speak at PhotoPlus Expo-NYC

Come to PhotoPlus Expo in New York City, October 25-27 (complementary show passes from Datacolor are available here)  and see presentations by David Saffir and myself. We will be speaking at the Midwest Photo Exchange Stage. Here is the preliminary schedule for the speaking events:

Thursday 10/25
11:30:  David Saffir- Screen to Print Match for Photographers
1:30:  David Tobie- Moving into Motion: Video and Video Color for Photographers

Friday 10/26:
11:30:  David Tobie- Moving into Motion: Video and Video Color for Photographers
1:30:  David Saffir- Screen to Print Match for Photographers

Saturday 10/27:
11:30:  David Saffir- Screen to Print Match for Photographers
1:30:  David Tobie- Moving into Motion: Video and Video Color for Photographers

All events above will be taking place on the Midwest Photo Exchange Stage at #1027 on the show floor.

Be sure to visit Datacolor, nearby at booth #1239, while you are there.

Credits: C. David Tobie, Copyright 2012. Website: CDTobie.com Return to Blog’s Main Page